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How To: Enable TRIM with Non-Apple SSD Discussion


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#1 Kevin OBrien

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 02:57 PM

This guide talks about enabling TRIM support on a new OSX Lion system with an aftermarket SSD.

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#2 ChrisMcPole

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:37 PM

as soon as apple completes the move and starts using their own ssds only, they will patch the hole...

#3 Kdawgca

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 06:14 PM

So true...hopefully people will find a way around it.

@KO/Dan. Have you tried Trim Enabler 2.0? Their December Beta 4.0 seems to solve most issues(see the comment section)?

Trim Enabler 2.0

Even though Terminal is a great tool that everyone should get to know, it might make it easier for people who may be a little sloppy with their copying and pasting(you are dealing with Apple users afterall :P).

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#4 mike2h

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 01:04 PM

i thought owc went through apple validation?

#5 Brian

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 11:42 AM

Good point, I had forgotten about that actually. I'm not entirely sure though what that means and how that may play into Apple's plans of making their own SSDs. I really hope Apple doesn't close down the upgrade of storage though, that's taking their ecosystem argument too far.

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#6 udaman

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 01:56 PM

This guide talks about enabling TRIM support on a new OSX Lion system with an aftermarket SSD.

Read Full Article


If you happened to update your notebook or desktop to an SSD, enabling TRIM is a must for the best long term sustained performance.

^FAIL, wrong.

http://macperformanc...b2011-TRIM.html

Last updated March 05, 2011 - Send Feedback

TRIM is a solid state drive (SSD) feature that turns marginal designs into usable drives. In essence, it’s a command that tells a drive “clean up your internal mess”.

With the 2011 MacBook Pro, the Apple System Profiler has no inserted a TRIM Support line in its drive features list (see below).

A line of text indicating that TRIM support is present has nothing to do with whether the OS supports using TRIM, which remains an open question. And a well designed drive doesn’t need TRIM, more on that below.


TRIM vs solid design

Why would you want an SSD that cannot work reliably (maintain its performance) without regular tune-ups? To get a fast drive (to save yourself time) so that you can waste your time maintaining it? It’s self-defeating.

I use solutions that start fast and stay that way, which is why I use the OWC Mercury Extreme Pro or Pro RE, based on the Sandforce controller. See my Severe Duty Test.

The Mercury Extreme Pro (RE or non-RE) SSDs have not let me down in nearly a year of use, including a 3-way RAID-0 stripe (a much more punishing usage than a single SSD), and multiple other single SSD drives. No maintenance, no wasted time, which is exactly how it should be. I am not interested in science fair designs.


#7 Kevin OBrien

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 02:15 PM

^FAIL, wrong.

http://macperformanc...b2011-TRIM.html


If TRIM was completely worthless, Apple would have never even added it as a capability to OSX after Windows supported it for so long. SandForce models may have great GC properties but there are a ton of other controllers out there that don't fare as well without TRIM support. I know TRIM isn't the end all be all, but putting a blanket statement out there that it isn't needed in any application and supporting it with heavy Apple-influenced articles isn't really showing a non-biased response.

#8 jameskatt

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 01:52 PM

If TRIM was completely worthless, Apple would have never even added it as a capability to OSX after Windows supported it for so long. SandForce models may have great GC properties but there are a ton of other controllers out there that don't fare as well without TRIM support. I know TRIM isn't the end all be all, but putting a blanket statement out there that it isn't needed in any application and supporting it with heavy Apple-influenced articles isn't really showing a non-biased response.

 

The biggest argument I have against enabling TRIM is that TRIM is a SATA-only command.
 
SSD is attached via PCIe, USB 3.0, FireWire, or Thunderbolt cannot receive the TRIM command.  Macs won't even recognize them as SSDs.
 
The newest MacBooks now use PCIe SSDs. These obviously will not need TRIM.  Nor would any USB 3.0 or Thunderbolt attached SSD receive the TRIM command even if enabled.  
 
Enabling TRIM would be USELESS for SSDs the drives won't have an SATA controller to recognize the TRIM command.
 
SSDs (such as OWC Mercury SSDs with SandForce controllers) have evolved to the point they don't need TRIM - particularly when the SSDs are not attached via SATA?  They do their own garbage-collection and optimization.  
 
OWC - in particular - advises against enabling TRIM on their Sandforce controller OWC Mercury SSDs since this increases wear and tear on their SSDs. TRIM adds extra unnecessary writes when the SSD already did this on its own.  Enabling TRIM would essentially harm the SSD and shorten its lifespan. http://blog.macsales.com/11051-to-trim-or-not-to-trim-owc-has-the-answer
 
If modern SSDs need TRIM, they would be in danger of serious performance problems if the SSD was attached via a non-SATA connection such as USB 3.0 or PCIe or Firewire or Thunderbolt.  Unless the manufacturer insures their SSD's controller does its own version of TRIM, then they would suffer serious performance problems when attached via non-SATA connection compared to the competition.
 
This is why I argue that TRIM is currently useless in modern SSDs. 

Edited by jameskatt, 17 November 2013 - 01:53 PM.




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