Jump to content


Photo

Seagate Kills Off Green Hard Drives, Plans to Launch Barracuda Hybrid


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Brian

Brian

    SR Admin

  • Admin
  • 5,303 posts

Posted 01 November 2011 - 09:50 AM

As part of today's announcement of 1TB hard drive platters shipping in the 3TB Barracuda XT, Seagate also released news that they'll cease production of their line of Green hard drives. Seagate also will be migrating the Barracuda XT line to a new Barracuda Hybrid line of hard drives, implementing the caching technology seen in their wildly popular notebook hybrid hard drive, the Momentus XT.


Seagate Kills Off Green Hard Drives, Plans to Launch Barracuda Hybrid Hard Drive

Brian

Publisher- StorageReview.com
Twitter - @StorageReview

 

#2 dhanson865

dhanson865

    Member

  • Member
  • 174 posts

Posted 01 November 2011 - 02:45 PM

As part of today's announcement of 1TB hard drive platters shipping in the 3TB Barracuda XT, Seagate also released news that they'll cease production of their line of Green hard drives. Seagate also will be migrating the Barracuda XT line to a new Barracuda Hybrid line of hard drives, implementing the caching technology seen in their wildly popular notebook hybrid hard drive, the Momentus XT.


Seagate Kills Off Green Hard Drives, Plans to Launch Barracuda Hybrid Hard Drive


Green HD going away? I didn't see that coming. I wonder if WD will keep making parts for that segment or if they'll follow suit and kill their green drives?

Hybrid HDs becoming more common, that I could see happening.

#3 Brian

Brian

    SR Admin

  • Admin
  • 5,303 posts

Posted 01 November 2011 - 02:48 PM

I'm not sure what WD is going to do, but they certainly have the green drive market cornered if they can make them.

Seagate is using the argument that power consumption isn't that different. They're right, the new 1TB platters are more power efficient when you only have three compared to the five in green drives. The big question is price though, the 7200RPM drives have been cost prohibitive for some applications like NASs and the like.

Brian

Publisher- StorageReview.com
Twitter - @StorageReview

 

#4 Noli

Noli

    Member

  • Member
  • 25 posts

Posted 01 November 2011 - 08:17 PM

Wh? Dropping the Green line?!! Because OEMs can't figure manage inventories? That's a pathetic argument! How do they manage all those so many different SKUs of CPUs, GPUs, RAM, mobos etc etc etc!? If anything HDD lines are relatively few and slow to develop. Sure power differences may be small but they're also much *quieter* and a hell of a lot cheaper - like 50% cheaper (WD Green vs Black). I really can't believe that - I for one will miss the diversity of choice and WD will get all my money instead.

Obviously if they start making super awesome cheap high capacity hybrid drives I may have to reconsider...

But even so, dropping a such a huge market when you're part of a duopoly makes fvck all sense to me.

#5 cbrworm

cbrworm

    Member

  • Member
  • 131 posts

Posted 01 November 2011 - 08:42 PM

But is there actually a cost differene to produce green drives?

#6 continuum

continuum

    Mod

  • Mod
  • 3,572 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 12:47 AM

I'm sure the "green" drives will come back under a different marketing label...

#7 mike2h

mike2h

    Member

  • Member
  • 259 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 11:42 AM

always wondered why green drives are cheaper. does going with a 54k motor vs 72k make that much diference in cost or are there quality issues to?

#8 Atamido

Atamido

    Member

  • Member
  • 288 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 11:54 AM

always wondered why green drives are cheaper. does going with a 54k motor vs 72k make that much diference in cost or are there quality issues to?

I imagine that reading platters at the slower speed is much easier, reducing the required quality levels. It's possible that platters with some defect making it impractical to use at 7200 could be re-purposed into a green drive.

#9 Brian

Brian

    SR Admin

  • Admin
  • 5,303 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 12:18 PM

A lot of you are hitting on it, but price is going to be the main issue at play. Power...okay, it's close, Seagate argues the actual cost difference in power savings is .40/year. I think that depends a whole lot on how you use the drive. We'll see how drive prices shake out after the shortage, but prior, Green drives were substantially cheaper. I'd be surprised if Seagate lowers the Barracuda price to match WD's Caviar Green. On the flip side, it's a bit strange that WD doesn't have a 3TB performance drive.

Brian

Publisher- StorageReview.com
Twitter - @StorageReview

 

#10 [ETA]MrSpadge

[ETA]MrSpadge

    Member

  • Member
  • 744 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 04:14 PM

I think Seagate is right about the power being mostly irrelevant. Unless you've got tons of drives for bulk / cloud storage, that is. But even there you might appreciate the performance benefit of 7.2k rpm drives.

However, there's one important advantage to lower rpms: it's easier to hit higher platter densities. If they can do 1.0 TB platters at 7.2k rpm, the same tech should be good for about 1.2 TB platters at 5.4k rpm.. if history is any indicator. And unless there was some revolution in r/w-head technology, which totally gets around this limitation.

That the current Green drives haven't been updated with higher density platters is IMO just a matter of cost and marketing. 1 TB platters + heads are surely in limited supply, so you'll rather sell them in a more expensive 7.2k rpm drive.

I just had an idea, which may clear this "no more Green" mess up: Seagate might sell the Green drives under the Samsung label und use their own name for the higher performing drives, increasing their perceived value. They'll enjoy larger profit margins due to overall higher HDD prices and leave the highly competitive (at least in terms of /TB) market for Samsung-HDD. Or in the long term replace the Samsung label with something else.

MrS

#11 ChrisMcPole

ChrisMcPole

    Member

  • Member
  • 134 posts

Posted 02 November 2011 - 05:51 PM

and WD will get all my money instead

Oh yes, with current pricing for their drives it would not be difficult.. ;)


I imagine that reading platters at the slower speed is much easier, reducing the required quality levels. It's possible that platters with some defect making it impractical to use at 7200 could be re-purposed into a green drive.

Correct. Yet another reason why I would never buy a green drive for any data worth of something.



Seagate might sell the Green drives under the Samsung label und use their own name for the higher performing drives, increasing their perceived value.

Seagate will try to make sure the Samsung HDD brand is killed ASAP, and they are doing just that. It would not be like with Maxor when two brands existed side by side for some time. Samsung makes higher quality drives, unlike Maxtor, and that is very bad for Seagate's marketing effort...

#12 Brian

Brian

    SR Admin

  • Admin
  • 5,303 posts

Posted 03 November 2011 - 08:27 AM



I just had an idea, which may clear this "no more Green" mess up: Seagate might sell the Green drives under the Samsung label und use their own name for the higher performing drives, increasing their perceived value. They'll enjoy larger profit margins due to overall higher HDD prices and leave the highly competitive (at least in terms of /TB) market for Samsung-HDD. Or in the long term replace the Samsung label with something else.

MrS


You know, neither WD nor Seagate has talked yet about how they're going to leverage the brands of Samsung and Hitachi. Samsung has certainly made a name for themselves with great low cost drives, the F4EG used to be a tremendous value. Maybe you're on to something...leave the mid market for Sammy and go high end with Seagate? I just can't see them throwing away what is a large market segment...assuming people will pay more for 7200 RPM drives.

Brian

Publisher- StorageReview.com
Twitter - @StorageReview

 

#13 Mickey

Mickey

    Member

  • Patron
  • 2,276 posts

Posted 03 November 2011 - 09:15 AM

Are either of the deals finalized? They may not be able to formally talk about how they plan to integrate before that; might get them in some sort of legal trouble.

#14 Brian

Brian

    SR Admin

  • Admin
  • 5,303 posts

Posted 03 November 2011 - 10:36 AM

The deals are finalized but awaiting regulatory approval before they can close. Both are expected soon, Seagate early December and WD before the end of the year. And yes, they won't talk much about their plans publicly until those deals are closed. Sounds like WD has to make some concessions too.

Brian

Publisher- StorageReview.com
Twitter - @StorageReview

 

#15 dhanson865

dhanson865

    Member

  • Member
  • 174 posts

Posted 04 November 2011 - 01:31 PM

I'm not sure what WD is going to do, but they certainly have the green drive market cornered if they can make them.

Seagate is using the argument that power consumption isn't that different. They're right, the new 1TB platters are more power efficient when you only have three compared to the five in green drives. The big question is price though, the 7200RPM drives have been cost prohibitive for some applications like NASs and the like.


That assumes consumers only care about capacity. I want single platter drives but I'll consider 2 platter or 3 platter drives if they don't make the single platter an option.

If you compare platter to platter (2 x 1TB @ 7200 vs 2 x whatever GB @5900 or @5400) you still get a noticeable power difference at the lower RPMs. And honestly I don't give a damn about the extra GB or TB.

I'm literally typing this on a system with a 2TB green drive that is setmaxadress limited to about half of that that is then partitioned into C and D drives and I'm only using about 150 GB out of the 2TB capacity. I'd be fine if this 3 platter HD just had less platters and was sold as a 1.3TB drive, a 1TB drive, or even the single platter variant of say 650GB (I'd rather it not be called 666GB but that's just me).

Really, it's my only drive in the system and I have 25GB on C and 125GB on D. I wouldn't be limited by a single 1 TB platter. I'd still short stroke it but I'd be happy to have the power savings, reduced noise, reduced heat, reduced vibration, greater shock resistance of reduced platters.

I know this is an older drive but I think the comparison is still valid in terms of the engineering trade offs of more platters

WD Black 640GB vs 1TB comparison

Drive Ready Time 11 sec  13
R/W Power watts  8.3     8.4
Idle Power watts 7.7     7.8
Standby watts    1       1
Max shock        300     250
Performance seek 29      33
Quiet seek       26      29

and that is a comparison of a 3 platter vs a 2 platter. The difference can be even more pronounced when going from 2 to 1.

So going full circle, sure 3 platters @ 7200 RPM is similar to 5 platters @ 5400/5900 RPM but there is room to go further. If they take green drives away and replace them with 1 and 2 platter 7200 RPM drives then I'll be all for it. I'll take the extra RPM at lower platters. If they take them away and force the purchase of 3 platter drives then I'm going to look elsewhere. I don't want lots of platters at high rpms.

#16 [ETA]MrSpadge

[ETA]MrSpadge

    Member

  • Member
  • 744 posts

Posted 08 November 2011 - 03:19 PM

Sounds like a Samsung F4 320 GB with 1 half platter used, at 7.2k rpm would be the right HDD for you rather than a 2 TB Green.
And single platter drives are not going away anytime soon. Office machines just don't need 1+TB.. and they know it. That's why even in the time of "Seagate only doing 1 TB platters at 7.2k rpm" Seagate is still producing 250 GB drives based on 500 GB platters (link).

sure 3 platters @ 7200 RPM is similar to 5 platters @ 5400/5900 RPM

Yeah, but with current technology they could easily do 3 TB at 5.4k rpm with platters, or even push capacity to ~3.5 GB.

Personally I prefer 2 platter drives, since they provide much more storage than single platters (and I can make good use of that), but don't feature the extreme price premium of the top products. And personally I think 1 and 2 platter Green drives are kind of a waste. If there's any reason to go for them it's for cheap maximum capacity.

MrS

Edited by [ETA]MrSpadge, 08 November 2011 - 03:20 PM.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users