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SandForce SF-2200 & SF-2100 SSD Processors Released


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#1 Brian

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Posted 24 February 2011 - 09:23 AM

SandForce has brought their second generation SSD processors to the consumer space with the SF-2200 and SF-2100. The new processors leverage much of the technology from the enterprise controllers announced last year. The SF-2200 includes support for the SATA 6Gb/s interface and is the first controller to enable 500 MB/s+ read and write speeds for consumer SSDs. The SF-2100 is designed for mainstream SSDs and uses a SATA 3Gb/s interface to enable read and write speeds up to 250 MB/s.

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#2 re-dux

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 09:35 AM

SandForce has brought their second generation SSD processors to the consumer space with the SF-2200 and SF-2100. The new processors leverage much of the technology from the enterprise controllers announced last year. The SF-2200 includes support for the SATA 6Gb/s interface and is the first controller to enable 500 MB/s+ read and write speeds for consumer SSDs. The SF-2100 is designed for mainstream SSDs and uses a SATA 3Gb/s interface to enable read and write speeds up to 250 MB/s.

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I wondering if you could please give an update to this article?

The typical client based SF2xxx offerings are based on 60, 120 & 240 GB capacities. All appear to have 12.7% unseen capacity, based on RAW NAND capacity, but it is unclear if part of that capacity is being used for RAISE.

It would appear that a 60GB drive would only have enough capacity for RAISE, leaving (nearly) nothing left over for OP.

Also are you sure that RAISE improves performance? I thought it was the other way around i.e. RAISE adds over head.

#3 Brian

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 09:48 AM

RAISE uses about 7% across all the SF drives we've seen.

RAISE definitely increases performance, that's straight out of the mouth of SandForce. The endurance management routines are not "hard" and having the extra room to work for wear leveling, etc makes the drive more efficient.

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#4 re-dux

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 10:04 AM

RAISE uses about 7% across all the SF drives we've seen.

RAISE definitely increases performance, that's straight out of the mouth of SandForce. The endurance management routines are not "hard" and having the extra room to work for wear leveling, etc makes the drive more efficient.


Hmm. I can understand why OP would help performance but not RAISE. With RAISE OFF you have more OP to help performance. With RAISE ON you have less OP, to the extent that you end up with more or less nothing with a 60GB drive.

Could you please ask SF to reconfirm?

Why is RAISE OFF an option for SF2xxx drives? (I can't see how the risk factor has changed from SF1xxx drives. If anything has it not increased?
How can you tell if RAISE is ON or OFF?
Does RAISE help or hinder performance by taking away OP?

#5 Brian

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 10:38 AM

You can tell is RAISE is enabled or not by the capacity of the drive. 128GB vs 120GB...off vs on.

SandForce offers dozens of customization options for their controllers, who uses them or not is up to the licensees.

OP helps to some extent with performance, but OP is more about drive endurance. RAISE definitely makes drives faster or we'd see drives in the market with it disabled.

Brian

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